Headache Management After Concussion (Guidance for Primary Care Management)

Headache Management After Concussion (Guidance for Primary Care Management)


Management of Headache Following Concussion/Mild
Traumatic Brain Injury: Guidance for Primary Care Management in Deployed and Non-Deployed
Settings Clinical Suite Promotional Video Audio Description The words “Traumatic Brain Injury statistics”
are staggering appear on the screen in dark blue text on a white background. The whole sentence moves to the left and the
camera zooms into the period at the end of the sentence, revealing a spinning white globe
on a dark blue background. The globe continues to spin as white text
reading 347,962 appears to the left of the globe and “Number of medical TBI diagnoses
worldwide” appears to the right. There is a footnote at the right hand bottom
on the screen in white reading “Number of active-duty service members with a first-time
TBI diagnosis between 2000 and 2016”. The globe spins fast and the continents disappear
leaving a white ellipse and a brain made of small dark blue dots appears. White text reading “84%” appears to the left
of the brain graphic and “Proportion of brain injuries classified as mild (known as a concussion)”
appears centered underneath the brain graphic. The brain graphic transforms into white circle
with a person, from the waist up, made of dark blue dots and connected lines inside
the ellipse. White text reading “You can access state-of-the-science
resources to help heal this unique, invisible wound that impacts service members, veterans
and their families” appears above the circular graphic. Four persons outlined by white dots and connected
lines appear, two to the left and two to the right, connected by lines spouting out from
the circular graphic. Around their heads, a pulsing red glow appears. The four people disappear off of the screen
and the circular graphic scales down to a small single dot, which expands and disperses
into hundreds of white dots in various sizes that are connected by white lines. The acronym “DVBIC” appears in white text
at the top center of the screen and expands to read “The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury
Center”. White text appears below to read “offers 90+
state-of-the-science resources to treat post-injury symptoms” as four blurry TBI product titles
appear in white in the background and a footnote of white text enters the bottom right of the
screen reading “To access DVBIC resources, visit dvbic.dcoe.mil/headache”. The camera pans to the first product title
in the top left corner and becomes focused text reading “Assessment and Management of
Dizziness Associated with Mild TBI”. The camera pans down to right to reveal the
text “Progressive Return to Activity Following Acute Concussion/Mild TBI”. The camera pans straight up to the top to
reveal the text “Management of Sleep Disturbances Following Concussion/Mild TBI”. The camera pans to the bottom left to reveal
the text “Management of Headache Following Concussion/Mild TBI”. All of the words on screen disappear except
the word “Headache” and the word moves to the left as the dark blue background changes
to a medium blue background. A side profile of a brain made of white dots
enters the screen from the right and travels fast to the left, colliding with a straight
vertical line that appears to the right of the word “Headache”. On impact, the brain shakes and parts of it
turn red. The word “Headache” is followed by words in
white text that phase into the screen to complete a sentence reading “Headache is the most common
symptom reported following a mild TBI”. The sentence and line disappear as the brain
turns from a side profile to the bottom and moves into the right side of the screen. Two rows of ten persons in each row appear
to the left of the brain graphic, each person outlined in white dots with connected white
lines. The text “In a study of Operation Enduring
Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom veterans, 74% reported post-traumatic headaches occurring
within 30 days of sustaining a concussion” appears in white at the top center. On top of the brain graphic on the right,
a percentage in white text increases from 0% to 74% with a pulsing red glow around 74%
of the brains on the two rows of people. Everything on screen disappears except the
brain, which moves to the center. Above the brain, white text reading “18-33%
of post-traumatic headaches persist beyond one year” appears. The brain spins and lands at a side profile
view pointing in the right direction. White text appears to the right of the brain
reading “Classification” and then “Migraine, tension-type, cervicogenic and neuropathic”
that appears to the right of the brain graphic. The brain spins and points in the left direction
and white text, to the left, reads “Characteristics” followed by “Inciting events, prodromal signs
or symptoms, pain and visual or sensory symptoms”. The brain spins again and lands in the front
view, revealing white text reading “Treatment” and “Pharmacologic (e.g., over the counter
medications) and non-pharmacologic (e.g., lifestyle changes)” to the right. All text on screen disappears and the medium
blue background changes to a light blue background as the camera zooms out and the brain disappears
into a person (waist-up) is outlined by white dots and connected lines. White text reading “DVBIC resources can help
you manage TBI symptoms and return a patient to pre-injury duty” appear at the top center. The person and text on screen disappear, revealing
three TBI products center-screen with white text below reading “Access Management of Headaches
Following Concussion/Mild TBI products and other clinical suites today to aid TBI recovery”. All text and graphics fade out. White text appears at the top center of the
screen, reading: “For more information, please access the DVBIC
website via: dvbic.dcoe.mil/headache” and the MHS and DHA logos appear in the center
of the screen, next to each other. Below the logos, white text in the center
reads “About DVBIC and its Partners: DVBIC is a part of Defense Centers of Excellence
for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury and collaborates with the DoD TBI Quad
Services (U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force) as well as the U.S. Army Medical
Research and Materiel Command; Joint Trauma Analysis and Prevention of Injury in Combat
Program; National Intrepid Center of Excellence; U.S. Central Command; Readiness Division of
the Defense Health Agency; the Coast Guard; and the Department of Veterans Affairs”.

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