Mental Health Awareness & Kids with Kati Morton | Mindy from Millennial Moms

Mental Health Awareness & Kids with Kati Morton | Mindy from Millennial Moms


– Let’s define mental illness. – Can we not function in
some form of our lives, whether it be school,
work, friends, family. Just to let your child know that nothing’s wrong with them. – Hey everyone, I’m Mindy
with Millennial Moms. And today I have a special guest with us. Katie. – Hi. My name is Katie Morton. I’m a licensed therapist and
I have a mental health channel on YouTube where I talk about
all things mental health. – Which is so cool, ’cause
I think that kind of… You don’t really get
that a lot on YouTube, like that kind of information. – [Katie] No. – So it’s super awesome. Be sure to check out all of her links in the description box below. You can find her channel and see some of her awesome videos. But today I wanted to touch base since this is Millennial Moms, we’re talking about kind of
like millenials and parenting. Wanted to first… Let’s define mental illness. – Okay. So mental illness, in
truth, if it’s gonna be– I always categorize it by
is it diagnosable or not? That would be if it’s a mental illness. And we say things are mental illnesses when they are impeding
or stopping our ability to live our everyday life. Can we not function in
some form of our life, whether it be school,
work, friends, family. Whatever. Then you could definitely characterize it. – So definitely like anxiety, depression, things like eating disorders. – Yep. – But what about like, I’ve
always wondered like, ADHD. Is that considered
technically a mental illness? – It technically is because,
at least in the states, it’s in the DSM, which is the Diagnostic
and Statistical Manual. Without getting too clinical on you, there’s a certain amount
of characteristics, and they literally can’t
function at school or work. – So my next question
I guess would be like, as a parent, like at
what, is there a magic age that you start seeing
mental illness come on, or does it depend on the mental illness? – It depends on the mental illness but usually around puberty. And so that’s gonna vary child to child, but it’s usually around the age when we start seeing things. Or but you could think of it, even you could consider
like the autism spectrum. – Yep. – It could be much younger. So I always tell parents
if there’s something that your child is having trouble with, or like a milestone they’re not hitting that your other children or other kids at school are hitting, then that’s the point
where you need to reach out and talk to another
professional, a school counselor, and talk to your child. Find out how they’re feeling. – So a lot of you guys know that my son Daxton has
been diagnosed with ADHD. When you notice, I think
he was fairly young. Like he was only like
two, and we could see that he wasn’t hitting
some of the same milestones that our other children
had hit at the same age, and so yeah, we started bringing in like some OT and
some PT and some speech to try to get him some help. But he really wasn’t officially
diagnosed until he was five. Which is still fairly young. But with him, I mean it
really was impeding… Listen, I got story after story about him being in kindergarten and getting pulled out
of class like 30 times because he literally could
not function in class. Correctly. Like his behaviors were just bad because his brain was telling him, you know sending all
kinds of crazy messages to his poor body. And so.
– Yeah. – [Mindy] It was really hard for him. – And ADHD, and any kind of diagnosed in childhood type disorder, usually if it’s not speech
related, happens in school. Because that’s when we have
to interact with others, or if you have them in like different Gymboree classes and stuff. And when we have to interact
with other children, we have to sit when they tell us to. We have to pay attention. We have to listen to directions. Things will start to come out and it will start to, you know, kind of expose the symptoms of whatever they’re struggling with. – So that’s the point where
you would then say like, if they’re noticing those things happening over and over and over, that they should maybe
like look for a diagnosis. Or go see a professional. – Yeah, just to let your child know that nothing’s wrong with them
and that it can be helped. And for you the parent. It can be really difficult on both ends.
– It was very difficult. – [Katie] And I always
encourage my parents who have a child that I’m seeing to see someone themselves
because it’s hard. And I think one of the
hardest things for parents is often to admit that something
is wrong with their child. Because we want the best for them. We want more for them. We want everything to be easy breezy. And so when we come into
contact with something that’s not as easy and not perfect, we can have our own issues with that. And so usually having both is the best. – Our counselor did the same thing. Like he actually insisted
that Shaun and I go and have some like counseling about how to deal with Daxton
because there were, there’s literally like training on how to deal with a kid like Dax. So.
– Yeah. – [Mindy] And it was good. It was good for us to go and hear that and to recognize that some
of the things we were seeing and hearing like with
Daxton were kinda normal. – Yeah. And it makes, it makes you feel better. And I think that’s the
same for the children too. Is like, understanding that
nothing’s wrong with you. It’ll be okay. We’re just getting you some extra support because the way your
brain works is different from other people and we’re
trying to figure out how to… Best– – Best help you to compensate for that. – Exactly. – But like if you were a
family that had a child that didn’t experience
any mental health issues, like how do you prepare
them to like interact with children that they
might meet at school? Like when do you start talking about that? – I’d say honestly that
you can never go too young. I know that sounds like really extreme. But the truth is that children… Like when I first spoken with children who are let’s say seven, eight, even six. They have no judgment. So like, oh I had a kid
in my class once that had, they fell down and shake, like had epilepsy and seizure.
– Oh okay. – [Katie] They won’t
know what it’s called, but they don’t have any judgment about it. They’re like, oh the
teacher told us to be quiet and be kind
– Interesting. – [Katie] And there’s no,
where as we get older we think, oh, they’re weird or we might… People are bullies and
we see things happen. And at a younger age we
don’t really have that. So I don’t think there’s
really too young of an age to talk to them about it. I think they honestly, especially if they have
someone in their class, you could talk to them about it. Or if they even have questions or if they see a homeless
person rambling on the street. You can talk to them about that. I don’t think it’s a scary
thing to bring up with children. – It would’ve been very helpful for parents to have had
conversations like that when Daxton came into their classroom because I think kids would
have been more forgiving. And they were. Like Daxton’s had a really
positive experience with school. But I do think that
there are a few children that he just doesn’t mesh well with, and they’re maybe the ones
that just don’t understand what Daxton’s limitations are, or his, like what he
needs extra help with. – Yeah. – And so they just don’t
tolerate it as well, so I think those conversations
are really healthy. – Yeah, and it helps everybody. It helps the teacher,
it helps the children. And it also just helps
us all better understand as we get older, what mental illness and mental health can look like, and how it doesn’t mean that we’re crazy. It doesn’t mean something’s broken. It just means sometimes we’re just, it takes a different tool to
get us to do the same thing. – Which I love, like, I know I’ve used this example before with Dax. ‘Cause sometimes, like
even my own parents, when Dax was first diagnosed
and put on medication, they were like, so will he eventually
not need the medication? You know, like will he outgrow it? And I know that sometimes, some kids do, like when they hit puberty, but I really think with Dax, ’cause his is kind of extreme
that he probably won’t. And it was like kind of a learning thing for my parents to explain to them, like, would you tell a diabetic
that they need to just like, outgrow their insulin? You know, like and it’s, but I don’t… Sometimes I think people don’t think about mental health being the same as like a physical issue. – Yeah, even though it really
should be treated that way. That’s one of the, it’s
like would you tell someone with a broken leg to keep walking on it? No. But we tell children
and people with anxiety or depression to just– – [Mindy] Get over it. – Yeah. Well just get outside more.
– Yeah. – [Mindy] Think positive thoughts. – Yeah! And like, that’s not how it works. – Yeah, that’s not how it works. – My leg is still broken. – Yeah. – Yeah. – So I think that’s really a good point, to just be like, you know unfortunately for some reason their bodies
aren’t behaving correctly, and this is how you fix that. – Yeah. Yeah, exactly. And I think medication
comes with its own stigma. – Yes it does. – Because people think
oh, you’re depending on the medication, and you know, they overprescribe
for kids these days. And all the things we hear. But the truth of it is if your
child is having a hard time and they’re struggling to function, if there’s something you
can do to help with that, help with that. – I think you know. Like look, having been a
mom, I was as freaked out about the meds and stuff, like I was concerned
about those things too. So we did kind of like blind tests, like we did not tell Daxton’s teachers that we were putting him on the meds, we just decided to do it and then if they noticed a difference, we would know they were helping, you know?
– Perfect. – [Mindy] And it was like immediately, like within two days his teacher called us and said whatever you’re
doing, keep doing it. ‘Cause it is like a
totally different child. Like it’s night and day difference. And we were like hey, you
wanna know what we were doing? We put him on medication. – Yeah. – And it’s helping him. Like it’s now sending the
correct signals with his brain. – Yeah. – And she was like– – Feels probably better about himself too.
– Oh yeah, way, way. – [Mindy] I can tell
just by the way he walks and moves his body. Like there literally is a difference. It’s hard to explain, but the way he talks,
the way he moves his body when he’s not on his meds versus his meds, completely different. So it’s really interesting to see how much that has helped him. – Yeah. – But I know all kids are different. So not saying you should all do that. – No, talk to your providers. Get all the information, then make a decision that’s best for you and your family
– Correct. – [Mindy] Yeah. I think that’s great. Thanks for hanging out with us you guys. And if you want to check
out Katie’s channel, be sure to click this button right here and go subscribe. You can find some of our
other Millennial Moms videos by clicking right here, and you can find some of
Katie’s awesome videos by clicking right here. You will enjoy them thoroughly. We’ll see you guys later. Bye guys! – Bye!

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