New Link A Generation Under Pressure: Talking Mental Health

New Link A Generation Under Pressure: Talking Mental Health


MUST BE BETTER AT SUPPORTING ITS
STUDENTS. THAT’S A GOOD DRAMATIC POINT.
(LAUGHTER). AGAIN, I WANT TO THANK YOU ALL
FORWARD COMING TODAY AND JOINING US IN THIS
IMPORTANT CONVERSATION ABOUT HOW WE CAN MOVE FORWARD.
NOW I WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE KENA HAZELWOOD, A
STUDENT IN THE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM, IN THE
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, WHO WILL BE
INTRODUCING THE ESTEEMED PANELISTS YOU’LL BE HEARING FROM
TODAY. THANK YOU. (APPLAUSE) Speaker: I’M NOT QUITE SURE IF
YOU WANT US ALL — WELL, HI, EVERYONE. GOOD
AFTERNOON. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: I
APOLOGIZE IF I MIGHT SPEECH IS SLIGHTLY DISTORTED. I
GOT BRACES ON TODAY.
VERY EXCITING. IT’S ACTUALLY A PERFECT OBJECT
LESSON AS TO MENTAL HEALTH HERE AT BERKELEY. I WAS
GRINDING MY TEETH SO BADLY MY SECOND YEAR I BROKE A
TOOTH IN MY SLEEP AND HAD TO GET BASICALLY ENTIRELY RECONSTRUCTED DENTAL WORK.
SO GO BEARS. (LAUGHTER)
I’M SO PASSIONATE ABOUT THIS PARTICULAR TOPIC.
I WORKED AS THE PRESIDENT OF THE GRADUATE ASSEMBLY
REPRESENTING THE OVER 11,000 GRADUATE STUDENTS ON
THIS CAMPUS FOR TWO YEARS. AND IN THAT WORK REALLY
TRIED MY DARNEDEST IN EVERY SINGLE MEETING TO TALK
ABOUT HOW OUR GRID STUDENTS ARE BEING IMPACTED BY
THIS ISSUE. IT’S NOT JUST AN UNDERGRADUATE ISSUE.
I’M SO EXCITED THAT WE HAVE CHANCELLOR CAROL CHRIST
HERE WITH US TO BE PART OF THIS CONVERSATION AS WELL
AS ASSISTANT VICE CHANCELLOR GUY NICOLETTE WHO IS
OUR NEW HEAD OF UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES. HE’S
ONLY BEEN HERE FOR THREE MONTHS BUT HAS ALREADY BEEN
HITTING THE GROUND RUNNING AND DOING AMAZING WORK TO
TRY TO CONTINUE TO CREATE OPPORTUNITIES FOR BETTER
SERVICE AS WELL AS SAM KU WHO IS HERE AS THE CHAIR I
BELIEVE — OR THE INTERNAL DIRECTOR OF THE
UNDERGRADUATE MENTAL HEALTH COMMISSION. I ASK YOU
ALL TO JOIN ME ON THE STAGE. (APPLAUSE). Kena Hazelwood-Carter: PART OF
MY BUDGET STUDY IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY IS LOOKING
AT HOW DO WE REMOVE THE BARRIER TO LEARNING FOR
STUDENTS. AND MY PARTICULAR INTEREST HAS ALWAYS
BEEN LOOKING AT OTHER LESSONS IN WHAT WE CALL EMERGING
ADULTHOOD WHICH GOES FROM ABOUT 18 TO 25 AND
WHAT IS THE BIG ISSUES THAT WE’RE TALKING ABOUT HERE IS
EXACTLY THAT POPULATION AND ANXIETY BEING A
HUGE BARRIER TO ONE’S ABILITY TO FUNCTION.
BUT ONE OF THE THINGS I WANTED FOR QUICKLY JUST
FLAG IS REALLY MAKING A DISTINCTION BETWEEN JUST
EXPERIENCING ANXIETY AND WHAT IT MEANS HAVING A
CRITICAL LEVEL OF ANXIETY OR AN ANXIETY DISORDER.
AN ANXIETY DISORDER IS WHEN IT IS SOMETHING THAT
PREVENTS YOU FROM BEING ABLE TO CARRY OUT YOUR DAILY
FUNCTIONS. IT’S WHEN YOU HAVE A LARGER THAN WHAT
WOULD SEEM RATIONALE REACTION TO WHAT WOULD
OTHERWISE BE CONSIDERED A PRETTY NEUTRAL IMPETUS.
ONE OF THE THINGS I’M SO EXCITED ABOUT IN THIS
PARTICULAR REPORT TALKING ABOUT IS THE FACT THAT
WE’RE ALMOST SEEING IT BEING NORMALIZED, THIS IDEA
THAT ANXIETY IS JUST SOMETHING THAT IS PART AND
PARCEL OF YOUR EXPERIENCE HERE ON THIS CAMPUS.
AND IF WE’RE HAVING SUCH EXTREME REACTIONS TO
WHAT SHOULD BE A REALLY JOYOUS TIME, A TIME WHERE
YOU CAN TAKE SOME ADVISED AND SOME INADVISED RISKS,
IT’S SOMETHING WHERE WE HAVE TO REALLY ASK
OURSELVES, WHAT CAN WE DO AS INSTITUTIONS TO IMPROVE
PEOPLE’S OUTCOMES AND GET THEM NOT JUST TO COLLEGE
BUT THROUGH COLLEGE AND ON TO A SUCCESSFUL LIFE.
ON THAT NOTE, MY FIRST QUESTION IS SAM, FROM THE
UNDERGRADUATE PERSPECTIVE, WHAT DO YOU SEE AS
THE PERCEPTION OF ANXIETY AS PART OF BERKELEY’S
CULTURE? Sam Ku: CAN EVERYONE HEAR ME?
OKAY. I WOULD SAY THAT IT’S AN
INTEGRAL PART OF BERKELEY’S CULTURE. AMONG THE
UNDERGRADUATES IN BODY, WE HAVE THIS THING WE CALL
THE RACE TO THE BOTTOM CULTURE. THIS ACADEMIC STRESS. Kena Hazelwood-Carter:
HOW DO YOU SEE FACULTY ADMINISTRATORS PERCEIVING THIS
CULTURE OR RACING TO THE BOTTOM? DO YOU THINK
THEY’RE AWARE OF? HOW DO YOU SEE THEM ADAPTING OR BEING
RESIST ANT TO THESE CONVERSATIONS? Speaker: I THINK WE HAVE A HUGE
EDUCATION PROJECT WITH FACULTY TO MAKE
THEM MORE AWARE OF THE KINDS OF THINGS THAT THEY SAY
THAT MAY BE INCREASING ALSO STRESS ON STUDENTS . OFTEN WHEN I TALK TO
STUDENTS, I SAY THIS INSTITUTION IS FOR YOU. IT’S
FOR YOUR CHOICES. IT’S WHAT — IT IS FOR WHAT IS
GOING TO BE GRATIFYING OR REWARDING FOR YOU. AND I
JUST HATE THE IDEA THAT SOMEHOW STUDENTS ARE
COMPETING IN THE STRESS OLYMPICS. I’VE REALLY BEEN
THINKING ABOUT HOW CAN I TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS
PERIOD OF MY LIFE TO DEVELOP CAPACITIES, TO DEVELOP
MYSELF TO BE THE ADULT THAT I WANT TO BE.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: WE TALK ABOUT THE
STUDENT EXPERIENCE. BERKELEY IS A VERY LARGE
SCHOOL. WE HAVE OVER 11,000 GRADUATE STUDENTS. WE
HAVE OVER 30,000 UNDERGRADUATES. WHAT DOES THAT
LOOK LIKE WHEN IT COMES TO SHOWING UP AT UNIVERSITY
HEALTH CENTER WHEN PEOPLE ARE SEEKING HEALTH? DO
YOU SEE TRENDS AND WHEN AND HOW? Speaker: I THINK THE
FACULTY AND STAFF .
Speaker: OH, IT’S 6:00 AND I HAVE THIS OTHER
THING TO DO AND IT BECOMES A BIT OF A MODELING
EXERCISE. SO I THINK CERTAINLY WE CAN TURN THE
MIRROR ON AROUND OURSELF. AS FAR AS WHAT WE SEE AT UHS,
YES, I MEAN, WE — I HAVE SOME DATA THAT I RECENTLY
PULLED ABOUT WHAT WE SEE AT UHS THAT FOLLOW THESE
TRENDS. I DON’T THINK YOU WOULD LEARN ANYTHING
MORE FROM LOOKING AT UHS-SPECIFIC DATA.
I THINK THAT THE TIMING PROBABLY IS A LITTLE BIT
OVERBLOWN. YES, WE DO SEE MORE IN TAKING DURING
MIDTERMS OR AT PEAK TIMES DURING THE YEAR. I THINK
RIGHT NOW IS A FAIRLY CONSTANT FLOW OF STUDENTS THAT
ARE LOOKING FOR HELP AND THEY FELT THAT THEY NEEDED
IT THAT TIME. AND IT DOESN’T ALWAYS CORRELATE WITH
MIDTERMS OR ACADEMIC STRESS. I THINK IT’S THE
UNDERLYING CULTURE THAT WE’VE HELPED PARTICIPATE IN
THAT ALLOWED THEM TO FEEL THAT WHENEVER THEY FEEL
IT. THAT SAID, IT’S CLEAR THAT THE
MAJORITY OF INTAKES HAPPEN DURING THE MIDDLE
OF THE SEMESTER. OCTOBER IS A PEAK TIME. AND
THEN FEBRUARY/MARCH ARE PEAK TIMES FOR OUR INTAKES.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: SAM, IS THAT
SOMETHING THAT YOU ARE SEEING REFLECTED AS
YOU DO YOUR WORK? AND WHAT ARE PEOPLE ACTUALLY
REACHING OUT FOR? IS IT ALWAYS FOR UHS OR OTHER
RESOURCES THAT THEY ARE HOPING TO FIND?
Sam Ku: I THINK THE EXPERIENCE ACROSS —
OBVIOUSLY I CAN’T SAY FOR EVERYONE. BUT I THINK
IT’S KIND OF IMPORTANT TO ACKNOWLEDGE THAT THERE ARE
STRESSORS OTHER THAN ACADEMICS THAT ARE DRIVING
STUDENTS TO COME TO UHS. SO, FOR EXAMPLE, FOR
BASICALLY NEEDS, IF THEY’RE WAITING FOR THEIR FOOD
STAMPS, FOR CALL FRESH TO KICK IT, THAT’S A SPECIFIC
STRESSOR. OR IF THERE’S A POLITICAL ACT, HATE CRIME
HAPPENING, THEN THAT’S GOING TO AFFECT WHO’S GOING
TO COME IN AND SEEK RESOURCES.
AND IN TERMS OF SEEKING HEALTH, I FIND THAT A
LOT OF PEOPLE TURN TO PEERS BUT THEN WHETHER OR NOT
THEIR PEERS ARE SKILLED IN BEING ABLE TO HELP THEM
WITH THAT PROCESS VARIES ACROSS THE BOARD. A LOT OF
TIMES I KNOW HERE’S THE NUMBER TO PING. BUT, AGAIN,
THERE’S THAT STIGMA, THAT DIVIDE WHETHER STUDENTS
WILL ACTUALLY SEEK SERVICES. THEN THERE’S WILL I
WALK YOU THROUGH THE INTAKE PROCESS? WILL I TELL
YOU WHAT IT’S GOING TO LOOK LIKE?
AND, ALSO, STUDENTS — THERE ARE WAYS THAT YOU
CAN SEEK SUPPORT OUTSIDE OF A MEDICAL LENS. SO
REACHING OUT TO YOUR COMMUNITY, REACHING OUT TO YOUR
SUPPORT NETWORK OR, IN FACT, JUST LIKE FALLING ON
REALLY UNHEALTHY WAYS TO COPE WITH THESE STRESSORS.
SO AS PROFESSOR SCHEFFLER MENTIONED, SUBSTANCE
ABUSE, I THINK SELF-MEDICAL INDICATION WITH DRUGS
AND ALCOHOL IS REALLY COMMON. I THINK IT’S A WHOLE
VARIETY OF STUDENTS ACROSS THE ACROSS THE STUDENT BODY.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: YOU MENTIONED MEMBERSHIP
OF DIFFERENT IDENTITY GROUPS MIGHT DRIVE HOW PEOPLE
THINK OF MENTAL HEALTH, WHAT ARE THE RESOURCES THEY
ACTUALLY FEEL COMFORTABLE SEEKING, THE ONES THAT ARE
ABLE TO FIND SOME SORT OF RESIDENCE WHEN THEY DO
ENGAGE WITH IT. I’M CURIOUS, ESPECIALLY BECAUSE THE
DATA IS SHOWING THAT AT LEAST WITH A HUGE FACTOR IN
HOW ANXIETY IS SHOWING UP, I WANT TO QUICKLY FLAG
THAT RACE AND SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS AND SEXUALITY,
ALL OF THESE THINGS ARE NOT PREDICTIVE. THEY’RE NOT
DRIVING IT. THEY’RE ARTIFACTS OF A SOCIETY THAT
THESE FOLKS LIVE WITHIN THAT IS APPARENTLY HOSTILE
TO THEM AND IS SHOWING THIS IS A SOCIETY THAT DOES
NOT YET KNOW HOW TO CREATE SPACES THAT IS SAFE FOR
PEOPLE WITH ALL THESE DIFFERENT EXPERIENCES.
HOW DO YOU SEE, CHANCELLOR CHRIS, THE CHRIST, THE CAMPUS TO
FIND WAYS TO CREATE NEW SAFE? Chancellor Christ: I
THINK WHERE STUDENTS CAN GO AND FEEL LIKE THIS IS A PLACE
THAT UNDERSTANDS THEM, THAT IS A GOOD RESOURCE
FOR THEM. WE’RE TRYING TO PROVIDE COUNSELING
OURS IN THESE SPACE SO THAT MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES ARE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE.
I ALSO THINK THAT IT’S SO IMPORTANT TO JUST
BECOME MORE DIVERSE. IF YOU ARE LIKE AN AFRICAN
AMERICAN COMMUNITY, 3%, YOU’RE JUST GOING TO FEEL
ISOLATED ON THIS CAMPUS BECAUSE IT’S A REALLY,
REALLY SMALL PERCENTAGE. IN PART BECOMING MORE DIVERSE, I
HOPE, WILL CREATE MORE OF A SENSE OF
INCLUSION AND ACCEPTANCE OF A WIDE DIVERSITY OF
IDENTITIES. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: I HAVE A
LIST OF SOME OF THE DIFFERENT GROUPS BECAUSE WE
THINK SOMETIMES WHEN WE SAY STUDENTS IT IS
MONOLITHIC. I WANT TO PULL IT APART. THIS IS FROM
TRADITIONALLY UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS EITHER BECAUSE OF
RACE, STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES, ATHLETES,
FIRST-GENERATION DOCUMENTS, UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS, HOMELESS
STUDENTS, OTHER MAYBE NOT AS SUPPORTED RELIGIOUS
AFFINITY STUDENTS, TRANSGENDER STUDENTS, AND OTHER
LGBTQ STUDENTS. WHEN WE’RE REALLY LOOKING AT
THAT, YOU MENTION THE CENTER WHICH IS THE BLACK
RESOURCE CENTER ON CAMPUS, IF YOU ARE NOT FAMILIAR WITH IT,
WHAT ELSE EXISTS ON THIS CAMPUS? HOW DO WE ROUTE
PEOPLE TO ACTUALLY ACCESS THESE SPACES?
Guy Nicolette: I’LL TAKE THAT ONE BECAUSE WE —
AN UHS RESPONSE THAT WE’VE BEEN STRONGLY IN FAVOR OF
AND WE’RE TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO BEST DEPLOY
AND STILL UTILIZE THE RESOURCES THE BEST WE CAN
BECAUSE OF LIMITED RESOURCE IS TO TRY TO MEET
STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE. SO WE HAVE 11 SATELLITE
LOCATIONS. WHAT’S INTERESTING TO ME AT LEAST ABOUT
THAT IS THAT THERAPIST OR THOSE FOLKS REALLY GET
EMBEDDED WITHIN THAT COMMUNITY. AND I SUSPECT THAT
BECAUSE OF THE COMFORT LEVEL THAT DEVELOPS WITH THAT
KIND OF LONG-TERM RELATIONSHIP THAT WE ACTUALLY DO
DESTIGMATIZE THE ABILITY TO SEEK HELP AND TO GET
CARE. AND IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE A “LET’S SIT DOWN
FOR AN HOUR AND HAVE A FORMAL SESSION.” IT CAN BE
WHAT WE CALL “LET’S TALK,” WHERE IT’S LESS FORMAL
AND ALLOWS A BIT GREATER LEVEL OF ACCESS FOR THESE
COMMUNITIES TO TALK TO THAT COUNSELOR. SO I THINK
WE’VE BEEN VERY SUCCESSFUL IN TRYING TO PILOT THESE
MODELS. WE KNOW THAT’S NOT ENOUGH. THERE HAS TO BE — THAT
COUNSELOR SERVES A BIT OF EVERYTHING,
PREVENTION, A BIT OF OUTREACH, THE CLINICAL CARE,
EVEN SOMETIMES POST–VENTION WORLD. AND I THINK WE
NEED TO KIND OF THINK ABOUT HOW WE APPROACH THE
PREDICTIVE NATURE OF THIS AND HOW WE APPROACH THE
PROACTIVE FROM A FULL-CAMPUS LENS THAT DOESN’T JUST,
YOU KNOW, SPECIFY TARGETED GROUPS. WE NEED TO KIND
OF THINK BIGGER. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: I WONDER
IF I COULD ADD TO WHAT’S JUST BEEN SAID.
Speaker: PEOPLE ARE VERY FOCUSED HOUSING AND
NEEDS IN SECURITY. WHAT HAS HAPPENED AS THE CAMPUS
HAS GROWN, THE CAMPUS HAS GROWN BY ABOUT 10,000
STUDENTS IN THE PAST 15 YEARS. AND WHAT’S HAPPENED
AS IT’S GROWN IN THAT WAY IS THAT WE’VE BECOME A
COMMUTER CAMPUS WITHOUT REALLY THINKING ABOUT THAT
AS OUR IDENTITY. I’M SO AWARE OF STUDENTS JUST
WANTING PLACES TO BE THERE ARE COLLEGES THAT ARE LIKE
SMALL TOWNS IN WHICH EVERYBODY KNOWS
ONE ANOTHER. AND THEN THERE ARE ONES THAT ARE
LIKE BIG CITIES. BERKELEY IS LIKE A BIG CITY.
IT’S URBAN. YOU HAVE TO FIND YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD, BUT
WE MAKE FINDING YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD PRETTY HARD. AND
THE FACT THAT — I MEAN, WE’RE VERY FOCUSED ON THE
COST OF OUR LOW PERCENTAGE OF CAMPUS HOUSING,
CREATING DIFFICULTY IN FINDING RENTAL UNITS FOR JUST
ABOUT EVERY CAMPUS POPULATION, TOO MUCH MONEY SPEND
ON HOUSING. BUT IT ALSO HAS AN IMPACT ON STUDENTS’
ABILITY AND EVEN FACULTY’S ABILITY TO FIND
COMMUNITY. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: THANK
YOU. YOU MENTIONED YOU HAVE THESE
SATELLITE CENTERS. HOW DO YOU SELECT THE LOCATION FOR
THEM? Guy Nicolette: I’LL ADMIT IT
SOUNDS A BIT A LITTLE ONE BY ONE AND A LITTLE
HAPHAZARD. WE — I THINK INITIALLY IT WAS
REQUEST-BASED. AND NOW WE’VE STARTED TO FIGURE OUT A BIT
MORE ABOUT THE MODEL AND WE’RE GOING TO BE A BIT MORE
INTENTIONAL ABOUT HOW TO GROW THAT PROGRAM OF
SATELLITE LOCATIONS WITHOUT DIVERTING TOO MANY RESOURCES
FROM THE CENTRAL OPERATION. SO THAT’S STILL IN A
LITTLE BIT OF FLUX. I THINK STEPPING BACK A LITTLE
BIT, THE OTHER THING THAT WE HAVEN’T DONE AS
WELL IS LOOK AT DATA AND REALLY HAVE DATA-DRIVEN
DECISIONS AND DATA-DRIVEN DECISION-MAKING.
AND SO WE’RE IN THE PROCESS OF REALLY KIND OF
PICKING APART THE FOLKS THAT DO COME SEE US AND,
FRANKLY, THE FOLKS THAT DON’T COME SEE US. THAT MAY
EVEN BE MORE — GIVE US MORE INSIGHT OR MORE MEANING
WHEN WE START TO LOOK AT THOSE FOLKS THAT WE KNOW
LIKELY ARE TO BE STRUGGLING OR POSSIBLY BE
STRUGGLING AND NOT ACCESS OUR STUDENTS AND WHY.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: THANK YOU FOR
BRINGING UP DATA. I KNOW THE GRADUATE
ASSEMBLY DID A GRADUATE STUDENT WELLNESS AND
HAPPINESS SURVEY IN 2016. AND ONE OF THE BIG
FINDINGS FOR US WAS THAT 64% OF STUDENTS WHO WERE DOING
GRADUATE-LEVEL WORK IN THE HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS
WERE REPORTING DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS. IT WAS
VERY MUCH TIED TO THEIR ANXIETY AND FEAR AROUND BEING
ABLE TO FIND A JOB POST-GRADUATION AND WHETHER THE
ACADEMIC MARKET OR ANY OTHER MARKETPLACE THEY’RE
LOOKING FOR. THAT’S BEEN A HUGE AREA OF CONCERN. SO
PART OF THE QUESTION OF HOW DO YOU SELECT
THOSE SATELLITE SPACES AND THEN TO KIND OF PULL ON THE
SECOND PART IS YOUR RESPONSE, SAM, THE QUESTION OF
DATA. WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU THINK THE QUESTION SHOULD
BE ASKING? HOW CAN WE DO A BETTER JOB OF ASSESSING
WHAT THE NEEDS OF OUR STUDENTS ARE?
Sam Ku: YEAH. I MEAN, I THINK THERE’S ALL OF
THESE SURVEYS. WE HAVE TO LOOK AT WHO IS RESPONDING
TO THE SURVEY AND WHO ISN’T. FOR EXAMPLE, WE HOSTED
SESSIONS WHERE FOLKS WHO HAD TROUBLE GETTING THE
ENGLISH SURVEY COULD TAKE THE SURVEY FOR STAFF WHO
HAVE THESE LONG SHIFTS WHO DON’T HAVE TIME TO
CONTRIBUTE THEIR EXPERIENCE AND THEIR NEEDS. THE
QUESTIONS ASKING HAVE TO BE REALLY INTENTIONAL. BUT
ALSO THE EFFORT WE’RE PUTTING INTO ASKING THESE
QUESTIONS, THERE ARE SO MANY STUDENTS WHO ARE
VOICING THE SAME THING, SAME CONCERNS OVER AND OVER
AGAIN. AND I THINK THERE CAN BE A LOT OF POWER IN
NARRATIVES OF WHAT STUDENTS HAVE ALREADY BEEN
VOICING FOR YEARS NOW INSTEAD OF SORT OF STARTING
FROM SQUARE ONE AND DEVELOPING THESE DATA-COLLECTING
INITIATIVES THAT HAVE BEEN TRIED, HAVEN’T GOTTEN AS
MUCH TRACTION AS IT SHOULD AND, THEREFORE, DOESN’T
LEAD ANYWHERE. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: I’M
CURIOUS IF YOU HAD A MAGIC WAND, UNLIMITED RESOURCES
EVEN THOUGH, OF COURSE — WE NOW HAVE THE $15
MILLION THAT THE GOVERNOR HAS WILL PUT TOWARD
SHELTER AND FOOD, BUT WHAT WOULD BE THE ONE, MAYBE TWO
— IF YOU WANT TO GET ADVENTUROUS, THINGS YOU
WOULD LIKE TO SEE THIS CAMPUS DO OR HAVE US RECONSIDER
IN OUR APPROACH TO MENTAL HEALTH FOR OUR STUDENTS?
Chancellor Christ: I THINK THERE’S SEVERAL
THINGS. ONE IS, OF COURSE, PUTTING ENOUGH RESOURCES
IN COUNSELORS AND THERAPIST SO THAT WE CAN HAVE
APPROPRIATE CRISIS INTERVENTION, APPROPRIATE
TREATMENT FOR STUDENTS THAT ARE EXPERIENCING HIGH
LEVELS OF ANXIETY AND HIGH LEVELS OF STRESS OF
WHATEVER SORT. BUT I ALSO THINK WE SHOULD BE
PUTTING RESOURCES INTO WELLNESS PROGRAMMING. YOU
TALKED ABOUT THE POWER OF NARRATIVES.
AND I THINK IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT TO DO AS MUCH
AS WE CAN TO GIVE STUDENTS THE RESOURCES TO BE RESILIENT, TO HANDLE STRESS, TO
— AND TO PROVIDE SOME OTHER NARRATIVES THAT ARE
NOT THE STRESS OLYMPICS OR “I HAVE TO GET UP AT
4:00 IN THE MORNING TO START TABLING ON THE PLAZA.”
THERE’S A WONDERFUL LINE IN A POEM BY GEORGE MANLY
HOPKINS ABOUT BEING TO BE MY SAD SELF HEREAFTER
KIND. AND I THINK THAT’S A REALLY IMPORTANT
CAPACITY TO NOURISH, IS SELF-KINDNESS. Sam Ku: KIND OF LIKE WHAT
CHANCELLOR CHRIST SAYS IS INCREASING RESOURCES,
BUT WHAT THOSE RESOURCES LOOK LIKE CAN BE
DIFFERENT. LIKE MEETING STUDENTS WHERE THEY ARE AT.
THAT COULD MEAN PHYSICALLY WITH THE SATELLITE
OFFICES BUT ALSO MEETING STUDENTS WHERE THEY’RE
AT IN TERMS OF WHAT THEY’RE ORGANIZING IN THEIR
COMMUNITIES, GIVING THEM THE RESOURCES SO THAT THEY DON’T
HAVE TO PUT THEIR PERSONAL AND ACADEMIC LIVES ON
THE LINE JUST TO FIGHT TO HAVE A SPACE ON THIS
CAMPUS. BECAUSE AS WE CAN SEE, WHEN THOSE SPACES ARE
ESTABLISHED AND THEY’RE ALLOWED TO FLOURISH,
THEN THE POWER OF COMMUNITY REALLY KICKS IN TO ACT
AS A SUPPORT NETWORK WHEN THEY ARE OVERCOME
WITH ANXIETY. I THINK THE SECOND PART IN
ADDITION TO THAT IS JUST BASIC NEED SECURITY.
HAVING ENOUGH RESOURCES TO TACKLE HOUSING, ECONOMIC
SECURITY, FOOD SECURITY IS GOING TO TAKE SO MUCH AND
LESS ANXIETY ON THIS CAMPUS. THERE CAN’T REALLY BE A
CONVERSATION ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLNESS
BEFORE THAT HAPPENS. Chancellor Christ: I AGREE WITH
THAT. I WAS REALLY STRUCK, RICHARD, IN THE
DATA THAT YOU SHOWED IN YOUR SUMMARY OF YOUR RESEARCH
OF THE IMPORTANCE OF THE DATE 2008. AND YOU SAID
WHEN YOU CAME BACK IN 2008, YOU NOTICED A CHANGE.
AND CERTAINLY YOUR DATA IS SHOWING SPIKES IN 2008,
AND THAT’S, OF COURSE, THE BIG — THE MAJOR,
MAJOR DEPRESSION THAT WE EXPERIENCED.
I’M STILL STRUCK WITH THE LEVEL OF ECONOMIC
ANXIETY THAT GRADUATE STAY TUNED, AS YOU WERE SAYING
BEFORE, KENA, CERTAINLY SHOW AND THE UNDERGRADUATES
SHOW, TOO. SO IN ADDITION TO GIVING MANY, MANY MORE
RESOURCES TO HOUSING, TO BASIC NEEDS, IT SEEMS TO ME
ANOTHER THING WE CAN DO BOTH ON A GRADUATE LEVEL AND
THE UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL IS INVEST MUCH MORE IN MORE
INTENTIONAL CAREER PLANNING. THAT MIGHT BE HOPEFUL
IN TERMS OF ANXIETY ABOUT, I DON’T KNOW WHAT’S GOING
TO HAPPEN WHEN I GRADUATE. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: SPEAKING
OF, OKAY, THIS BASIC NEEDS PIECE, FUNDING IS A
HUGE PIECE. WE ARE LOOKING AT TUITION HIKES. WE
ARE LOOKING AT FEES. GRADUATE STUDENTS OUT AT
BERKELEY OUT OF ALL THESE CAMPUSES PAY THE HIGHEST AMOUNT
OF STUDENT FEES. AND WHEN WE’RE LOOKING AT THESE
QUESTIONS, I KNOW WE JUST SIGNED A NEW UNION
AGREEMENT WITH THE GRADUATE STUDENT INSTRUCTORS, BUT HOUSING
WASN’T ADDRESSED IN THAT CONTRACT. WHERE ARE WE
GOING TO GET THIS MONEY? LIKE, HOW DO WE CONVINCE
THE GOVERNOR — UNDER GOVERNOR BROWN THERE WAS
CLEARLY A PREFERENCE IN GRADUATING IN CHECKS AND
CSUs. HOW DO WE SHOW IMPORTANCE OF INVESTING IN THESE
STUDENTS AND MAKING SURE THAT OUR WELL-BEING IS PUT
FIRST AND FOREMOST? Chancellor Christ: I WOULD HAVE
SOMETHING REALLY HELPFUL TO HOPEFUL TO
ANSWER TO YOUR QUESTION, KENA, I’VE BEEN FINDING
EXTRAORDINARILY PRODUCTIVE AND PROMISING DISCUSSIONS WITH
PHILANTHROPISTS. THE ARTICLES ABOUT STUDENT
HOMELESSNESS, ABOUT STUDENT HUNGER ARE REALLY HAVING THEIR
IMPACT. AND I THINK THERE ARE PEOPLE OF GREAT
CAPACITY THAT WILL BE WILLING TO STEP FORWARD AND MAKE
A VERY SUBSTANTIAL DIFFERENCE IN THE RESOURCES THAT
WE HAVE BOTH FOR BASIC NEEDS AND ALSO FOR
HOUSING. IN ADDITION, WE’RE REALLY LUCKY
THAT WE HAVE A FINANCIAL STRUCTURE FOR AT LEAST
BUILDING HOUSING THAT DOESN’T DEPEND ON THE
STATE, WHICH ARE PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS.
AND ESSENTIALLY WHAT WE FIND IS A PRIVATE PARTNER
BECAUSE — TO TAKE ON THE DEBT BECAUSE THERE’S AN
INCOME STREAM FROM THE ROOM CHARGES THROUGH RENTS,
DEPENDING ON WHAT THE KIND OF HOUSING IS.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: UHS CURRENTLY RECEIVES
NEARLY HALF OF ITS FUNDING FROM VARIOUS STUDENT
SERVICES FEES, INCLUDING 5% OF ITS OPERATING BUDGET
FROM THE WELLNESS FEE. 50% IS FROM OTHER KEYS AND
CO-PAYS. IS THIS ACTUALLY A SUSTAINABLE FUNDING FOR
UHS? WHAT OTHER SOURCES OF REVENUE COULD HELP
DEMANDS ESPECIALLY ONES THAT MIGHT NOT BE COMING OUT
OF STUDENT’S POCKETS WHEN THEY ARE ALREADY PAYING
TUITION AND HAVE TO PUT MORE MONEY IN FOR THESE
STUDENT FEES? Guy Nicolette: YEAH. I SEE MY
JOB AS BEING ABLE TO TRY TO ADAPT TO A LOT OF
DIFFERENT MODELS. SO I WON’T ANSWER THAT QUESTION
EXACTLY. BUT TECHNICALLY, WHAT I WANT TO SEE
HAPPEN IS LESS RELIANCE ON STUDENT FEES. AND
THAT’S NOT USUALLY JUST A QUICK LIGHT SWITCH FIX.
SO WE DO HAVE TO LOOK AT OTHER MODELS, AT A
COUPLE THINGS I’M INTERESTED IN ARE RESEARCH. WE
DON’T DO ENOUGH CLINICAL RESEARCH. AND NOT ONLY
FROM A FUNDING SOURCE BUT CERTAINLY FROM MORE SCIENCE TO BETTER
INFORM OUR PRACTICE, PHILANTHROPY WHICH THE
CHANCELLOR HAS ALREADY MENTIONED, WE HISTORICALLY
HAVEN’T DONE MUCH ON THE PHILANTHROPIC SIDE. AND I
THINK WE REALLY ARE PRIME TO START LOOK AT THAT A
LITTLE BIT MORE DEEPLY. AND THEN THERE’S PLENTY OF OTHER
OPTIONS THAT WE COULD CONSIDER. THIRD-PARTY
INSURANCE BILLING AND THINGS LIKE THAT TO, AGAIN, PUT
DOWNWARD PRESSURE ON THE STUDENT HEALTH FEE. I DID
NOTICE YOU DIDN’T GIVE ME A MAGIC WAND AND THAT’S
VERY SMART NOT TO GIVE A PHYSICIAN A MAGIC WAND OR
A CLINICIAN BECAUSE WE THEN JUST ASK FOR MORE
CLINICIANS. BUT I’LL SAY SOMEWHAT —
SOMETHING SOMEWHAT BLASPHEMOUS, I GUESS. I DON’T
THINK THE ANSWER IS MORE CLINICIANS, NECESSARILY.
YES, WE DO NEED TO MEET A RATIO THAT IS SET BY NOT
ONLY JUST KIND OF GOLD STANDARD INDUSTRY THOUGHT
BUT JUST A COMMON SENSE LEVEL OF REACTIVE
CLINICIAN WORK, ONE-ON-ONE AND GROUP SESSIONS. BUT I WOULD
POUR SOME OF THAT MAGIC-WAND EFFORT INTO SOME OF
THE THINGS THE CHANCELLOR MENTIONED, SOME OF
THESE HOUSING ISSUES WE FACE, SOME OF THE BASIC NEEDS
ISSUES. AND, FRANKLY, JUST TRYING TO FIGURE
OUT A WAY EITHER THROUGH SEED GRANTS OR SOME
OTHER MECHANISM WAYS TO REALLY CHANGE THE CULTURE HERE.
THAT’S WHERE WE’RE GOING TO GET, I BELIEVE, THE
BIGGEST BANG FOR THE BUCK. AND IT’S NOT SOMETHING
THAT’S GOING TO BE QUICK. YOU REALLY HAVE TO
INVEST IN DOING THOSE THINGS.
Chancellor Christ: I SOMETIMES WISH STUDENTS
WOULD VOTE DOWN THE FEES THAT THEY PROPOSE. I THINK
THESE ARE ALL PROBLEMS TO SOLVE. AND I HAVE COME TO
KNOW BERKELEY STUDENTS AS EXTRAORDINARILY GENEROUS
AND IDEALISTIC. BUT I SEE ALL THESE VERY WORTHY
CAUSES FOR WHICH THERE ARE STUDENT FEES PROPHASED
AND SOMETIMES THINK “WHY DON’T YOU VOTE THIS DOWN”
AND REALLY PUT THE BURDEN SOMEPLACE ELSE TO RAISE
THAT MONEY. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: WOULD
YOU BE WILLING TO PUT A OP ED IN THE PAPER?
(LAUGHTER) “CHANCELLOR SAYS VOTE NO.” I
KNOW THERE ARE A LOT OF CHANGES HAPPENING AT UHS.
WE’RE ABOUT TO HAVE OUR THIRD INSURANCE TEAMS
IN SIX YEARS. PEOPLE THAT ARE GETTING SERVICES, WE
ASK WHETHER THEY ARE PAYING DIRECTLY.
Guy Nicolette: IT WON’T IMPACT THE FOLKS THAT
WANT TO GET SERVICES ALMOST AT ALL. THERE ARE MINOR
LITTLE CHANGES THAT REALLY I THINK THE BIGGEST PAIN
POINT REALLY HAS BEEN THAT THE NETWORK HAS DIFFERENT
NEGOTIATED RATES FOR THOSE COMMUNITY PROVIDERS. AND
WE’VE BEEN WORKING REALLY HARD WITH THE COMMUNITY
PROVIDERS AND MOST ARE UNDERSTANDING OUR UC BERKELEY
STUDENTS AND ESSENTIALLY THE INITIAL PROMISE WAS
THAT WE WOULD NOT ALLOW THEM TO LOWER THE RATES THAT
THEY PREVIOUSLY ENJOYED WITH A DIFFERENT CARRIER.
AND I BELIEVE THERE ARE ONGOING MEETINGS
HAPPENING RIGHT NOW TO TRY TO SORT OF LAST FEW
ISSUES THAT REMAIN. WE KNEW THIS WAS GOING TO BE A
CHALLENGING CONVERSION. IT ALWAYS IS. THE
REASON WE CHOSE THIS PARTICULAR CARRIER IS WE WANTED
TO SET US UP FOR A LONG-TERM SUCCESS AND NOT KEEP
CHANGING INSURANCE PROVIDERS. AGAIN, A BIT MORE OF AN
INVESTMENT MINDEDNESS KNOWING WE WOULD HAVE TO GO
THROUGH THIS CHANGE. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: I’M
CURIOUS, CHANCELLOR CHRIST, AND VICE CHANCELLOR NICOLETTE IS OVERALL
COST. WE HAVE AN INCREASE IN STUDENT FEES. WE HAVE
AN INCREASE IN PRESCRIPTION COSTS, AN INCREASE IN
OUR PREMIUMS, INCREASE IN COURSE FEES, SUPPLEMENTAL
TUITION, ALL OF THESE DIFFERENT FEES. THEY DON’T
SEEM TO NECESSARILY BE IN CERTAIN SPACES. WHEN WE
TALK ABOUT THE COST BURDEN BEING A DIRECT IMPACT ON
THE ANXIETY STUDENTS ARE FEELING, HOW IS THAT BEING
TRACKED? ARE WE SEEING THAT ACTUALLY BE A REAL
CONVERSATION THAT’S HAPPENING, WHETHER IT’S AT
CABINET LEVEL OR IN OTHER SPACES?
Chancellor Christ: ABSOLUTELY. AND WHAT WE
SHOULD BE TRACKING IS ATTENDANCE. THAT SEEMS TO ME
MOST IMPORTANT. PEOPLE OFTEN GET FOCUSED ON TUITION
OR FEES AND IT’S REALLY COST OF ATTENDANCE. THAT’S
THE IMPORTANT THING. AND THEN FINANCIAL AID
RESOURCES. THOSE ARE THE TWO QUESTIONS WE SHOULD BE
ASKING AND TALK ABOUT. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: WHEN YOU
TALK ABOUT TOTAL COST OF ATTENDANCE, I KNOW
I’M DIGGING INTO THIS MORE, SUCH AS PRESCRIPTION
COSTS, THEY WENT UP FROM $5 TO $10 FOR MANY PEOPLE
THIS YEAR. SO THOSE PIECES, ARE THEY INCLUDED IN
THAT SINCE NOT EVERYBODY NEEDS A MONTHLY OR
DAILY — Guy Nicolette: I’VE NOT SEEN
SOME SORT OF COMPREHENSIVE COST OF EVERYTHING
THAT COULD HAPPEN BECAUSE IT’S SO VARIABLE TO BE
ABLE TO PREDICT. IT’S AN INTERESTING THOUGHT
THOUGH THAT IF WE TOOK SOME SORT OF BY-YEAR AVERAGE
BECAUSE THINGS DO CHANGE AS THE CAMPUS EXPERIENCE
GOES. A FRESHMAN ACCESSES DIFFERENT RESOURCES.
WE SEE IT IN DATA. WE SAW IT IN THIS DATA, THAT
FRESHMEN AND SENIORS LIKELY ACCESS THINGS DIFFERENTLY
AND LIKELY HAVE DIFFERENT COSTS ASSOCIATED IT.
I HAVEN’T SEEN — MAYBE THE CHANCELLOR HAS — IT
BROKEN DOWN TO THAT LEVEL.
Chancellor Christ: I HAVEN’T SEEN THAT EITHER.
WE WORK VERY MUCH WITH AVERAGES. I HAVE WONDERED
OFTEN WHAT THE COST OF ATTENDANCE FIGURE, IF IT’S
LOOK IN WHAT STUDENTS ARE EXPERIENCING. I’M NOT
THINKING OF PRECIPITATION DRUGS BUT REALLY THINKING
ABOUT THE WAYS IN WHICH HOUSING COSTS ARE SO HIGH IN
THE BAY AREA. WE’VE RECENTLY — THE OFFICE OF
THE PRESIDENT HAS JUST RECENTLY AGREED TO
RECALCULATE THE COST OF ATTENDANCE EVERY YEAR RATHER
THAN EVERY TWO YEARS. AND THAT’S GOOD.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: SAM, WITH YOUR WORK WITH
BASIC NEEDS AND THE MENTAL HEALTH COMMISSION, I’M
SURE THERE ARE MANY STUDENTS THAT WOULD QUALIFY OR
IMPACTED. WHAT ARE YOU SEEING FOR PARTICULAR NEEDS?
ARE YOU BEING TOLD LEGALLY THEY HAVE THE RIGHT TO
CERTAIN ACCOMMODATIONS? TO CERTAIN ACCESS? ARE
THEY BEING ABLE TO GET THE RESOURCES THEY NEED? AND
WHERE ARE THOSE BARRIERS COMING, IF THEY’RE NOT?
Sam Ku: YEAH. I MEAN, I THINK FRONT LINE OF
PEOPLE WHO QUALIFY FOR THOSE ACCOMMODATIONS AREN’T
AWARE THAT THEY CAN QUALIFY. OR EVEN IF THEY ARE
AWARE, THEY DON’T FEEL COMFORTABLE ENOUGH TO SAY,
“HEY, I NEED THESE ACCOMMODATIONS.” YOU TAKE A
LOOK AROUND THE BERKELEY CAMPUS AND
EITHER THERE ARE FACULTY DIRECTLY ASKING YOU WHAT
YOUR DISABILITY IS AND, THEREFORE, VALIDATING WHAT
ACCOMMODATION YOU NEED, WHICH IS ILLEGAL. OR, YOU
KNOW, STUDENTS SAYING “I THINK THEY’RE JUST
GOATING ACCOMMODATIONS SO THEY HAVE AN EASIER TIME IN
CLASS” AND FRANKLY THAT’S NOT ACCEPTABLE AND IT’S
PREVENTING SO MANY PEOPLE ESPECIALLY FROM
COMMUNITIES THAT ARE MARGINNIZED WHO HAVEN’T BEEN
TAPPED INTO THESE RESOURCES OFTEN FROM SEEKING THE
HELP THEY NEED. ASIDE FROM THE STUDENT
PERSPECTIVE, ALSO JUST THE DISABLED STUDENTS PROGRAM IS
SO UNDERFUNDED AND AS SOMEONE WHO IS PART OF DSP,
GETTING AN APPOINTMENT IS JUST IMPOSSIBLE.
AND ONCE YOU GET THERE, THE WAIT TIMES ARE LONG.
AND IF YOU FACTOR INTO THE FACT THAT YOU ARE A
DISABLED STUDENT WALKING INTO THAT SPACE, HAVING
TO WAIT THAT LONG WITH THE INCREASE OF NEEDS YOU
HAVE WITH YOUR DISABILITY, THEN IT’S LIKE WHAT
TYPES OF STRESSES ARE WE PUTTING ON THESE STUDENTS
TO GET THE HELP THAT THEY NEED?
Guy Nicolette: AND I WOULD ADD TO THAT, THAT I
DON’T THINK WE HAVE DONE AS GOOD A JOB WE CAN AND
WILL DO ABOUT COMMUNICATION BIDIRECTIONALLY.
THERE’S A LOT OF RULES AND LAWS AROUND HOW MEDICAL
THINGS ARE COMMUNICATED. BUT I THINK WE CAN DO
BETTER WITH DSP AND WITH THE STUDENT ABOUT KIND OF
CLOSING THE CIRCLE, INCREASING THE CIRCLE, HELPING
THE FLOW OF COMMUNICATION SO THAT YOU DON’T NEED
MORE APPOINTMENTS TO FIGURE OUT WHAT’S GOING ON,
THAT THERE’S, YOU KNOW, GOOD COORDINATION BETWEEN
YOUR HEALTH CARE AND KIND OF THE DISABILITY SERVICE
THAT YOU’RE GETTING THE ACCOMMODATION AND THINGS
LIKE THAT. I’M GLAD YOU BROUGHT THAT UP.
Chancellor Christ: WE HAVE BEEN INCREASING THE
AMOUNT OF EDUCATION THAT WE’RE GIVING TO FACULTY AND
THEIR OBLIGATIONS UNDER THE ADA. AND WE HAVE BEEN
INVESTING MORE RESOURCES IN DISABILITY. STILL NOT
SUFFICIENT BUT WE HAVE BEEN INCREASING RESOURCES.
WE HAVE NOW HAVE AN ADA COMPLIANCE COORDINATOR FOR
THE CAMPUS. SHE’S BEEN HERE ABOUT THREE MONTHS, I
THINK, SINCE ABOUT JANUARY. Kena
Hazelwood-Carter: ONE OF THE FINDINGS WAS
THAT SCREEN TIME WAS REALLY CONTRIBUTING TO — OR AT
LEAST WAS CORRELATED WITH AN INCREASE IN ANXIETY.
I’M CURIOUS, SAM, I WAS INTRODUCED TO BERKELEY MEANS
FOR EDGY TEAMS WHO IS TWO TIMES AGO THE PRESIDENT OF
ASUC. AND IT SEEMED TO BE — IT’S A FACEBOOK PAGE.
IT’S THE LARGEST COLLEGE-BASED FACEBOOK PAGE OF
ITS KIND IN THE ARE COUNTRY. IF YOU
EVER SEE ANY KIND OF FACEBOOK GROUP THAT HAS
SOMETHING, SOMETHING, EDGY SOMETHING IT’S BASED OFF OF
THAT NAME. STUDENTS ARE USING IT AS A WAY
OF EXPRESSING THEIR ANXIETY AND EXPRESSING THIS REAL
NEED FOR MORE. HOW DO YOU THINK WE CAN MAYBE
HARNESS SOCIAL MEDIA WHILE ALSO HELPING TO
ADDRESS THE FACT THAT IT SEEMS TO BE DIVIDING A LITTLE
BIT MORE OF THE ANXIETY?
Sam Ku: YEAH. I THINK THERE’S THIS REALLY
COMMON NARRATIVE AS SOCIAL MEDIA AS A CAUSE OF
ANXIETY OR OTHER MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES WHEN, IN FACT,
IT’S JUST A TOOL. AND WHEN YOU HAVE SOMETHING LIKE
THE MEME PAGE SORT OF CIRCULATING ALL THIS ANXIETY
THAT STUDENTS ARE INCREASING, IT’S NOT THAT THE
SOCIAL MEDIA IS THE CAUSAL FACTOR; IT’S THAT WHAT
ARE THE INSTITUTIONS THAT WE’RE LIVING IN THAT SORT
OF PUSH STUDENTS TO FEEL THIS WAY AND THEN,
THEREFORE, GO ONLINE TO VOICE WHAT THEY NEED OR WHAT
THEY’RE FEELING. AND IN TERMS OF, I GUESS,
SOLUTIONS, IT’S NOT LIKE WE CAN SENSOR THEM, —
CENSOR THEM, AS YOU SHOULDN’T, LOTS OF MOVEMENTS
ACROSS THE NATION RIGHT NOW ARE SORT OF HAVING MORE
EMPOWERING CONTENT ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND KIND OF
REWRITING THE SCRIPT AS OPPOSED — INSTEAD OF SORT OF
ONLY SHARING NEGATIVE EXPERIENCES OR SORT OF
NORMALIZING THIS TOXIC CULTURE. IT’S REALLY USING THIS
TOOL TO EMPOWER STUDENTS WITH OTHER NARRATIVES
AND SHOW THAT, YOU KNOW, THIS DOESN’T HAVE TO BE
THE WAY IT IS. Kena Hazelwood-Carter:
CHANCELLOR CHRIS, YOU HAVE BEEN USING TECHNOLOGY
YOURSELF AND SOCIAL MEDIA. IN PARTICULAR, BY
CREATING A RECALIBRATE WELLNESS SITE FOR STUDENTS. HOW
HAS THAT BEEN GOING? HOW HAVE YOU BEEN ABLE
TO RECLAIM SCREEN TIME FOR THE PROVERBIAL GOOD?
Chancellor Christ: GOSH, I’M THE WRONG PERSON
TO ASK THAT QUESTION. (LAUGHTER).
I DON’T USE SCREENS VERY MUCH, AND I HAVE A
WONDERFUL STAFF THAT DOES IT. IT’S NOT SOMETHING I
DO. BUT I THINK — I THINK IT’S
IMPORTANT TO THINK OF SCREENS — I REALLY AGREE
WITH YOU, SAM — AS NOT EVIL IN THEMSELVES BUT AS
SOMETHING THAT CAN BE A SYMPTOM AS MUCH AS IT IS A CAUSE
AND THAT YOU CAN USE SOCIAL MEDIA IN VERY, VERY
DIFFERENT WAYS. SO I’M VERY INTRIGUED.
I JUST WAS RECENTLY AT THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
OF UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS AND CHANCELLORS MEETING.
62 UNIVERSITIES, RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES, IN THE
COUNTRY. ONE OF OUR MAJOR SESSIONS WAS LEVELS OF
ANXIETY AND MENTAL ILLNESS AMONGST STUDENTS. IT’S
ON EVERY SINGLE ONE OF CHANCELLOR’S AND PRESIDENT’S
MINDS. THERE’S A LOT OF INTEREST OF WHETHER THERE
ARE ONLINE TOOLS. YOU WOULD KNOW MUCH MORE ABOUT
THIS THAN I. UCLA IS, IN FACT, USING ONE THAT TRIES
TO — IT’S AN ONLINE SURVEY THAT IDENTIFIES VERY
HIGH LEVELS OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION AND LOWER
LEVELS AND TRIES TO FIGURE OUT IF THERE ARE
ANY KIND OF ONLINE THERAPIES TO HELP AT
ALL. I WAS INTRIGUED BY WHAT YOU WERE SAYING. YOU
WERE SAYING YOU WEREN’T SURE THE BEST WAS
INCREASING OUR STAFF OF COUNSELORS.
Guy Nicolette: I THINK THAT IS A PART OF IT.
YOU ARE RIGHT. THERE’S A STEPPED CARE MODEL.
THERE’S THERAPY ONLINE THAT DOES TEACH PEOPLE. I
MEAN, THE CORNERSTONE OF TREATMENT OF ANXIETY IS
COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY. I MEAN, IT JUST —
AND SO THAT’S REALLY TEACHING YOURSELF OR SOMEONE
HELPING YOU UNDERSTAND THESE COGNITIVE DISTORTIONS
AND FIGURING OUT HOW YOUR BRAIN WORKS. AND THAT CAN
HAPPEN IN A SELF-HELP WAY, TOO.
CERTAINLY ON A FUNCTIONAL LEVEL, WE’VE CERTAINLY
BEEN EXPLOREING HOW DOES UHS AND TANG AND CAPS USE
THAT TOOL, WHATEVER TOOL IS CHOSEN, IN THE MOST
APPROPRIATE WAY SO THAT WE ARE CONTINUING TO NOT
FEED INTO THE PROBLEM BUT THAT WE’RE OFFERING THE
RIGHT HELP AT THE RIGHT TIME. WE’RE STILL —
THERE’S A LOT OF WORK TO BE DONE. THERAPY ONLINE
ISN’T PERFECT EITHER. BUT IT’S DEFINITELY A TOOL.
AND I WOULD AGREE WITH SAM. THE SCREEN TIME IS
A SYMPTOM. IT IS NOT THE ONLY PROBLEM. AND I THINK
THE MORE TIME WE THINK ABOUT — THE MORE EFFORT AND
ENERGY INTO DIMINISHING SCREEN TIME, ALL THAT MIGHT
SOUND GOOD. I THINK THERE’S PROBABLY A LIMIT TO ITS
EFFECTIVENESS AND DIMINISHING RETURNS HAPPEN VERY
QUICKLY. SO IT’S REALLY TO FIGURE OUT WHY THAT
SYMPTOM EXISTS AND USE IT AS PART OF THE, YOU KNOW,
KIND OF DIAGNOSTIC MEDIUM.
Chancellor Christ: THERE ARE ALSO OTHER THINGS
YOU CAN PROVIDE, LIKE MEDITATION, FOR EXAMPLE, YOGA,
I MEAN, THINGS THAT HELP ALL OF US DEAL WITH OUR
ANXIETY. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: WE HAVE
ABOUT 20 MINUTES LEFT. I WOULD LIKE TO SWITCH TO
SOME QUESTIONS THAT HAVE COME IN FROM OUR AUDIENCE.
ONE BEING: SHOULD THE CAMPUS REGULARLY SCREEN ALL
STUDENTS PROACTIVELY, AS PERHAPS AN
INITIAL DIAGNOSTIC TOOL AND THEN BE ALLOWED TO DO A
BETTER JOB TREATING AS WE WOULD WITH OTHER EPIDEMICS?
Guy Nicolette: SO THERE’S A LOT OF TALK ABOUT
UNIVERSAL SCREENING, AND I THINK THE IDEA HAS A LOT
OF MERIT. I THINK THE CHALLENGE BECOMES WHAT DO YOU
DO WITH — PARTICULARLY IF IT’S ONLINE, HOW DO YOU
CONNECT IMMEDIATELY WITH THOSE STUDENTS? HOW DO YOU
GET THEM IN THE STREAM OF CARE QUICKLY? SO I THINK
THERE’S SOME CHALLENGES TO IT, TOO. I’M NOT SAYING
IT’S A BAD IDEA, BUT I THINK YOU WOULD REALLY HAVE
TO BE INTENTIONAL ABOUT SETTING THAT UP IN SUCH A
WAY THAT YOU REALLY CAN ADDRESS ANY POSITIVES IN A
MINDFUL WAY. THE WORST THING THAT COULD
HAPPEN, SAID THE OTHER WAY, IS THAT SOMEONE SAYS
“YES, I’M STRUGGLING” AND NOTHING HAPPENS.
Chancellor Christ: I THINK WE SHOULD LEARN FROM
UCLA’S EXPERIMENT WITH THIS. AND WE’RE ABOUT TO
EXPLORE A JOINT RESEARCH PROJECT WITH UCLA ABOUT
ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION ON OUR CAMPUS COMMUNITIES.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: WE HAVE MANY STUDENTS
COMING TO THIS CAMPUS, MANY DIFFERENT WALKS OF LIFE,
MANY DIFFERENT POINTS IN THEIR LIFE THAT THEY FEEL
COMING TO BERKELEY IS APPROPRIATE. HOW DO WE CREATE
AN INCLUSIVE EXPERIENCE FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS AND
STUDENTS WHO MIGHT HAVE HAD AN INTERRUPTED PATH INTO
THEIR FORMAL EDUCATION TO MAKE SURE THAT THE ISSUES
THAT THEY ARE FACING ARE ALSO BEING ADDRESSED AND
THEIR ANXIETIES ARE BEING SEEN?
Chancellor Christ: HOUSING, HOUSING, HOUSING.
I THINK WE NEED HOUSING FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS. IT
WILL HELP WITH THE COMMUNITY. THEN WE CAN LOCATE
VARIOUS KINDS OF RESOURCES IN THE HOUSING ITSELF. I
THINK IT’S REALLY EXTRAORDINARILY IMPORTANT.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: THIS IS A QUESTION ABOUT
THE ONGOING-CONCERN THAT THERE IS GRADE DID HE
OPERATION THAT HAPPENS HERE ON CAMPUS AND THAT IS
CONTRIBUTING TO PEOPLE’S CONCERNS WHEN THEY’RE
COMING UP ON GRADUATION, WHEN THEY’RE LOOKING FOR
JOBS, HOW DO THEIR GPAs STACK UP AGAINST OTHER
SCHOOLS WHERE IT MIGHT BE SOMEWHAT EASIER TO GET
THAT 4.0 OR 3.8 THAT THEY MIGHT NEED.
Chancellor Christ: I’M REALLY INTRIGUED BY AN
IDEA I HEARD AT THAT AAU CONFERENCE THAT I JUST
REFERENCED ABOUT WHAT CAL TECH DOES, THEY DON’T GIVE
GRADES IN THE FIRST YEAR. AND I OFTEN WONDERED
WHETHER WE SHOULD DO A YEAR OR A SEMESTER WITHOUT
GRADES JUST TO ALLOW PEOPLE TO GET THEIR FEET. WHAT
DO YOU THINK, SAM? WOULD THAT BE WELCOMED?
(LAUGHTER) Sam Ku: I DON’T PRETEND TO KNOW
WHAT THE MECHANISMS OF GRADE DID HE
DEFLATION, BUT I WAS SITTING IN A CLASSROOM, I THINK THE
FIRST STEP WE CAN DO IS HAVING FACULTY MODEL THE FACT
THAT YOUR WELLNESS IS A PRIORITY AND THEN SECOND COMES
YOUR SUCCESS. SO HAVING REASONABLE EXPECTATIONS
FROM STUDENTS, HAVING, YOU KNOW, ATTENDANCE
POLICIES THAT FACTOR INTO, YOU KNOW, EMERGENCY
SITUATIONS, STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES, GIVING EXTENSIONS,
MAKING SURE THAT FOR SOME UNKNOWN REASON OUR
MIDTERM SEASON IS THE ENTIRE YEAR.
(LAUGHTER) I DON’T KNOW WHAT’S THE DEAL
WITH THAT. BUT IF THEY CAN DEAL WITH THAT AS WELL.
SO, YEAH. I THINK THERE ARE A LOT OF POTENTIAL
WAYS WE CAN TACKLE THAT, DEFINITELY.
Guy Nicolette: TO ADD ON TO THAT, I THINK JUST
TODAY, THIS MORNING, WE HAD — THERE WAS A
DISCUSSION ABOUT KIND OF OUR FOCUS ON HEALTH IN OUR
POLICIES AND THE EXTENDED MIDTERM SITUATION CAME UP.
AND EVEN ITS IMPACT ON THE TA OR THE GSI THAT NOW IS
RESPONSIBLE FOR GRADING RIGHT AFTER USUALLY A SPRING
BREAK. THE TIMING JUST GOES ON AND ON AND ON. SO I
THINK IF YOUR YOU’RE REALLY THINKING OF HEALTH IMPACTS
ABOUT THESE POLICIES, YOU CAN REALLY START TO UNRAVEL SOME INTERESTING
THINGS. MAKING CHANGES COULD IMPACT THE LEVEL OF
ACADEMIC STRESS AND BEURRE RAT TICK CENTERS THAT EVEN
FACULTY ARE GOING THROUGH.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: SPEAKING OF FACULTY, HOW
DO WE GET OUR FACULTY ON BOARD MORE? I KNOW THE
ACADEMIC SENATE HAS A LOT OF POWER IN TERMS OF WHAT
SYLLABI POLICIES ARE AND THAT SORT OF THING. HOW DO
WE GET THOSE KIND OF SPACES TO BE MORE WELCOMING OF
HURT, OF PAIN, OF BEING HUMAN, AND INSTEAD MOVING
FROM A CULTURE THAT SEEMS TO BE FOCUSING ON A QUICK
FAILURE SO THAT WAY YOU CAN DO BETTER AND CREATE A
CULTURE OF HELP SEEKING ON THIS CAMPUS?
Chancellor Christ: I THINK THE DISCUSSION HAS
TO HAPPEN IN LOTS OF DIFFERENT FORUMS THAT CERTAINLY
THE ACADEMIC SENATE BUT ALSO IN THE SCHOOLS AND
COLLEGES THEMSELVES AND THE DEPARTMENTS. I THINK
THAT’S WHERE THE CONVERSATION IS REALLY BEST
SITUATED. AND YOU NEED ENOUGH FACULTY THAT ARE —
HAVE THE ISSUE THAT THEY CAN BE PERSUASIVE TO THEIR
COLLEAGUES. I THINK YOUR REPORT, RICHARD, IS GOING
TO BE VERY HELPFUL. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: THE
CLIMATE FOR STUDENTS OF COLOR, DACA STUDENTS,
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS HAVE GOTTEN WORSE SINCE THE
ELECTION OF PRESIDENT TRUMP. ANXIETY IS PERHAPS EVEN
HIGHER. HOW CAN YOU STRATEGICALLY ADDRESS THE MODEL,
HEALTH NEEDS OF THIS VULNERABLE POPULATION — OR
THE MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS OF THESE VULNERABLE
POPULATIONS? Sam Ku: I THINK THIS GOES BACK
TO MEETING STUDENTS WHERE THEY’RE AT. I
KNOW CURRENTLY THE UNDOCUMENTED STUDENT PROGRAM HAS
HIRED AN INDEPENDENT CLINICIAN TO BE
HOUSED IN THEIR PROGRAM. AND I THINK IF WE PLACE PEOPLE
WHO ARE WELL-EQUIPPED TO DEAL WITH THESE ISSUES IN THE
COMMUNITIES THAT MOST PEOPLE IT, THEN THAT WOULD
HELP AS OPPOSED TO SUBJECTING STUDENTS WHO WERE
ALREADY UNDER A LOT OF STRESS AND PERHAPS HISTORICALLY
HAVE REASONS NOT TO TRUST MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS AND
TO SEEK HELP FROM THERE.
AND, ALSO, JUST — I THINK THIS GOES BACK TO A
LARGER CONVERSATION OF COMMUNITY AND DIVERSITY ON
THIS CAMPUS. IT’S HARD TO REACT AND PROCESS
THESE TRAUMATIC EVENTS THAT ARE HAPPENING ON A
NATIONAL, INTERNATIONAL LEVEL WHEN YOU
HAVE NO ONE TO TALK TO ABOUT IT. SO, YEAH, IT’S JUST
— ALL OF IT. Guy Nicolette: AND I WOULD ADD
THE DESTIGMATIZE DESTIGMATIZATION ELEMENT, THAT I
THINK PART OF THE DATA MIGHT SUPPORT THAT WE’VE
HAD SUCCESS IN CHANGING THE STIGMA PATTERNS,
THAT WE’VE ALLOWED AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE PEOPLE DO SEEK
HELP MORE THAN THEY DID IN 2008. SO I THINK YOU
COULD INTERPRET AT LEAST SOME OF THAT IN THERE.
BUT I SUSPECT FOR CERTAIN COMMUNITIES, AND DACA
BEING ONE OF THEM, THAT IT HASN’T REACHED KIND OF
THAT COMMUNITY. AND WE CERTAINLY HAVE EVEN IN UHS
RECOGNIZED THAT AS AN ISSUE AND HAVE A DEDICATED
PERSON. IT’S GOING TO TAKE TIME. BUT I THINK THAT
KIND OF INVESTMENT PAYS OFF IN THE LONG-TERM. AND
DIANE IS CERTAINLY WORKING HARD TO DO THAT.
Chancellor Christ: I THINK WE HAVE TO LOOK AT
WHERE OUR VALUES ARE AND ACTING ON THOSE VALUES, ALL
OF US, AND MAKING SURE WE’RE DOING OUR PART, EACH OF
US, THAT THIS IS A WELCOMING AND GENEROUS PLACE THAT
REALLY EMBRACES ALL OF ITS STUDENTS, ALL OF ITS
STAFF, ALL OF ITS FACULTY. Kena Hazelwood-Carter:
HOW WOULD YOU TRY TO EDUCATE STUDENTS ABOUT THE
IMPORTANCE OF SELF CARE AND WHAT ARE THE THINGS THEY CAN
POSSIBLY DO? AND WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OR WARNING
SIGNS THEY COULD LOOK OUT FOR? I LOVE ONE OF THE
CHANGES THAT UHS MADE THIS YEAR IS HAVING THE
COLLABORATE RATETIVE CARE MODEL. WHEN YOU GO IN, YOU
TAKE A SURVEY AND IT ASKS YOU QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR
ANXIETY. ASKS YOU QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR MENTAL
HEALTH. AND BASED OFF THAT SCREENER, ONCE YOU ARE
SEEING YOUR PRIMARY CARE PERSON, THEY WILL THEN BRING
SOMEBODY IN WHO IS PART OF THE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH TEAM.
SO THERE’S A WARM HAND-OFF INSTEAD OF SAYING, WE
HAVE TO REACH OUT TO TANG. I THINK THAT’S A
BEAUTIFUL WAY WE’RE SEEING, GRADUATE STUDENTS IN PARTICULAR,
OF GUESTING THOSE SORTS OF SUPPORTS. THEY HAVEN’T
TRADITIONALLY BECAUSE THEY’RE AFRAID IN SOME
CASES THEY WILL SIT IN THE WAITING ROOM FOR
COUNSELING SERVICES NEXT TO THEIR STUDENTS. AND THERE’S A
LOT OF FEAR AROUND THAT. GRADUATE STUDENTS HAVE
NOT BEEN SEEKING OUT HELP.
HOW CAN WE SUPPORT STUDENTS IN LEARNING ABOUT
SELF-CARE AND IMPLEMENTING THOSE VARIOUS
INITIATIVES? Guy Nicolette: I THINK THE EASY
ANSWER IS WE HAVE GOT A LOT OF RESOURCES
AVAILABLE ONLINE. GO TO THE UHS WEBSITE. IT’S EASY TO
FIND. I WOULD HAVE BEEN REMISS — THANK YOU FOR
BRINGING IT UP — THAT IT’S NOT JUST COUNSELING AND
PSYCH LOGIC SERVICES THAT CAN BE OF ASSISTANCE.
PRIMARY CARE CLINICIANS,
THEY CAN DIAGNOSE AND TREAT A LOT OF THESE
CONDITIONS WE’RE TALKING ABOUT. BUT A LOT OF
STUDENTS COMPARTMENTALIZE A LITTLE BIT. WE EVEN
COMPARTMENTALIZE A LITTLE BIT AND SAY YOU HAVE TO GO
HERE FOR THIS AND HERE FOR THAT. WHAT WE’RE TRYING
TO DO AT TANG AND UHS IN GENERAL IS BREAK DOWN THOSE
ARTIFICIAL, YOU KNOW, BARRIERS OR WALLS BETWEEN
SERVICES. AND THIS REALLY IS ABOUT A KIND OF NO
LONG DOOR. I KNOW THAT’S TALKED ABOUT A LOT. A NO
WRONG DOOR TO GET IN THE STREAM AND WE WILL WITH A
WARM HAND-OFF GET YOU THE CARE THAT YOU NEED AT THAT
POINT. AND THAT COLLABORATIVE IS AN ATTEMPT TO
DO THAT IN A STRUCTURAL, SYSTEMATIC
WAY. I THINK I’VE ALSO WANTED TO SAY
THAT THERE’S A LITTLE BIT OF BEATING UP OF
FACULTY. ALL THE FACULTY THAT I’VE MET HAVE BEEN
VERY NOT JUST ADVOCATES BUT PASSIONATE ABOUT
HELPING WITH THE MENTAL HEALTH AND ADVOCACY. WE
JUST DON’T HAVE A STRUCTURE TO DO IT. SO, YES,
THERE’S A GOLD FOLDER AND THAT’S VERY HELPFUL. BUT I
DON’T THINK THAT’S ENOUGH. AND WE NEED TO REALLY
THINK ABOUT HOW TO MAKE IT EASY FOR THEM TO HELP A
STUDENT ACCESS RESOURCES OR MAKE IT EASY FOR
THEIR DEPARTMENT TO DO THAT.
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: WHAT DO YOU SEE AS WAYS
TO BEGIN TO REMOVE THOSE BARRIERS?
Guy Nicolette: WHICH OF THE BARRIERS?
Kena Hazelwood-Carter: THERE ARE MANY. WHAT DO
YOU SEE AS THOSE PAY MORE POINTS THAT ARE DEFECTING
PEOPLE AWAY FROM THE HELP THAT’S NEEDED?
Guy Nicolette: THOSE CONVERSATIONS ARE HARD TO
HAVE EVEN WITH SOMEBODY TRAINED, TO START TO
INITIATE THAT CONVERSATION. BUT START WITH YOUR
MENTOR, YOUR FACULTY MEMBER THAT YOU WANT TO BE SEEN
AS DOING WELL AND ACADEMICALLY SUCCESSFUL. SO
JUST GIVING FACULTY AND STAFF THE
TOOLS TO START TO HAVE THOSE CONVERSATIONS, I THINK, IS
HUGELY IMPORTANT AND WOULD HELP IMMEDIATELY
REMOVE ONE BARRIER BECAUSE IT’S ALSO CHALLENGING TO
GO TO MEDICAL CARE SOMETIMES. WE DON’T WANT TO GO
SEE THE DOCTOR OR THE COUNSELOR A LOT OF TIMES.
AND CULTURALLY SOMETIMES THAT’S NOT PART OF
PEOPLE’S CULTURE. SO THE EARLIER WE CAN START TO
HAVE CONVERSATIONS AROUND MENTAL
HEALTH, SELF-HELP, ALL OF THESE OTHER FACTORS THAT
WOULD LEAD TO BETTER WELL-BEING, THE BETTER OFF WE
ARE. AND I THINK A LOT OF THE TIME SPENT WITH
FACULTY AND STAFF WOULD PAY OFF IN HUGE WAYS. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: I’M
CURIOUS, SAM, WHEN YOU WERE TALKING ABOUT STUDENTS
ACCESSING OR NOT ACCESSING — I KNOW WE TALKED
ABOUT MAYBE THERE’S CULTURAL NORMS OR INDIVIDUAL
PERCEPTIONS. I’M NOT ABLE TO DO THIS, I MIGHT NOT BE
THIS BAD OR MAYBE THIS IS NORMAL. OR I’M AT THE
BOTTOM SO I’VE WON. WHAT DO YOU SEE THE WAYS IN
WHICH STUDENTS ARE ACCESSING — LIKE, WHEN DO THEY
MAKE THE CHOICE TO SEEK HELP? AND WHEN HAVE YOU
FOUND, AGAIN, YOUR WORK WITH THE MENTAL HEALTH
COMMISSION, WHEN ARE THEY MAKING THAT CHOICE NOT TO?
HOW CAN WE MAYBE GET THEM TO CONTINUE TO SUPPORT
THE WORK THAT VICE CHANCELLOR NICOLETTE IS TRYING
TO DO? Sam Ku: I THINK UNFORTUNATELY
AND IRONICALLY THE ONES THAT ARE SEEKING
SUPPORT, THEY’RE IN CRISIS BUT THEY’RE NOT SEEKING SUPPORT
WHEN THEY’RE IN CRISIS. IT’S OFTEN THE SORT OF
LAST RESORT IN THAT, OKAY, I HAVE PUT THIS OFF
BECAUSE I’M REALLY BUSY WITH X, Y AND Z AND, YOU KNOW,
I’M JUST COMPLETELY BURNT OUT AND, THEREFORE, I WILL
GO TO URGENT CAPS. AND THEN YOU HAVE CLASS FROM
3:00 TO 4:00 AND IT’S ONLY OPEN UNTIL 5:00 AND YOU
DON’T ACTUALLY GET TO SEE A COUNSELOR.
AT LEAST FROM MY OWN PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AND
FROM THE EXPERIENCE OF OTHER PEOPLE I WORK WITH,
THAT ACT JUST DETERS PEOPLE FROM GOING IN THE FUTURE
BECAUSE THE WAY WE PERCEIVE IT IS, OKAY, I HAVE
THESE NEEDS AND THEY’RE NOT BEING MET AND,
THEREFORE, I HAVE NOWHERE TO TURN.
BUT IN TERMS OF PEOPLE ACTUALLY ACCESSING
RESOURCES, I THINK A REALLY POWERFUL TOOL IS IF
YOU’VE HAD, YOU KNOW, POSITIVE EXPERIENCES WITH
TANG, WITH MEDICAL CARE, AND MENTAL HEALTH CARE,
THEN, YOU KNOW, TEACHING YOUR PEERS HOW TO ACCESS
THOSE RESOURCES, WHAT ARE THE SMART WAYS TO NOT GET
NEGLECTED BY THE PEOPLE ON THE PHONE. WHAT ARE THE
SMART WAYS TO ADVOCATE FOR YOURSELF AND GETTING INTO
THAT DOOR? SO, YEAH, AGAIN, IT’S A VERY
COMPLICATED PROBLEM.
Guy Nicolette: JUST GETTING TO THE DOOR CAN BE
A CHALLENGE FOR SOME PEOPLE. IF THE SERVICES AREN’T
ALIGNING WITH THEIR NEEDS OR THEIR DESIRES EITHER
TEMPORARILY BY TIME OR I THINK BASED ON THEIR OWN
EXPERIENCES AND THE EXPERIENCE OF THE THERAPIST,
HONESTLY, EVERYBODY IN THIS ROOM, I WOULD LIKE A
LITTLE HOMEWORK. I WOULD USE YOUR FAVORITE SEARCH
BROWSER, WHATEVER IT HAPPENS TO BE, AND — OR YOUR
SEARCH ENGINE AND MEET THE STAFF AT UHS CAPS. AND
THERE’S A PRETTY LONG LIST, NAMES AND FACES AND
INTERESTS. AND I THINK YOU WOULD SEE AN INCREDIBLY
DIVERSE STAFF OF EXPERIENCE AND INTEREST AND
COMMUNITY THAT THEY SERVE. AND SO I KNOW WE CAN FIND
SOMEBODY FOR YOU. IT’S ON US TO, AGAIN, HELP YOU
BREAK DOWN THE BARRIER TO GET IN THE DOOR AND
THEN KIND OF GET IN THE STREAM OF CARE. THAT’S PART
OF MY CHALLENGE. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: WE HAVE
JUST UNDER FIVE MINUTES LEFT. I WOULD LOVE TO
GIVE THOSE MINUTES TO YOU ALL IF THERE’S ANYTHING YOU
WOULD LIKE TO SHARE THAT YOU THINK IS REALLY
IMPORTANT, THAT ARE EXCITING, THINGS THAT ARE COMING
DOWN THE PIKE OR JUST ANY KIND OF FINAL COMMENTS
THAT YOU’D LIKE TO MAKE. Sam Ku: I THINK THE ONE
TAKE-AWAY THAT I WOULD LIKE TO GIVE EVERYONE IS JUST TO
LISTEN TO THE STUDENTS. THEY KNOW WHAT
THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT. WE LIVE THROUGH THIS EVERY DAY.
I’M AMAZED BY ALL THE STUDENT ORGANIZERS IN MY LIFE
THAT WORK TIRELESSLY TO GET — YOU KNOW, HOPEFULLY
GET HEARD AND HAND OFF, LIKE, ALL THE WORK THAT
THEY’VE BEEN DOING. FINALLY GET INSTITUTIONALIZED AT
SOME POINT. AND THEN IT CONTRIBUTES TO THIS IDEA
OF BERKELEY AS THIS DIVERSE, INCLUSIVE SPACE
WHETHER, YOU KNOW, OFTENTIMES THAT’S NOT HOW
THEY’VE FELT AND THAT’S WHAT LED THEM TO THE POINT OF
HAVING TO PUT THEMSELVES ON THE LINE AND FIGHT
FOR THAT. YEAH, JUST LISTEN TO STUDENTS. MEET
THEM WHERE THEY’RE AT. THAT’S ABOUT IT. Guy Nicolette: I DON’T REALLY
HAVE MUCH — A PROFOUND CLOSING STATEMENT. I
WOULD SAY KIND OF FROM A PRAGMATIC APPROACH, FROM
KIND OF OF A FUNCTIONAL APPROACH, WE REALLY DO WANT TO
SERVE EVERY STUDENT THAT NEEDS CARE. AND I KNOW
THAT DOESN’T ALWAYS HAPPEN THE WAY WE WANT IT TO.
BUT WE’RE WORKING TO CHANGE THAT. AND I THINK BIGGER
PICTURE, I DON’T THINK WE’RE GOING TO BE ABLE TO
HAVE AS MUCH IMPACT UNLESS WE REALLY DO START TO
THINK ABOUT THE CULTURE AND ABOUT SOME OF THESE OTHER
POLICY AND PROCEDURAL THINGS THAT THE UNIVERSITY GOES
THROUGH AND HAVE AN IMPACT THERE.
Chancellor Christ: FOR ME, THE KEYS ARE REALLY
HOUSING AND BASIC NEEDS AND CHANGING THE CULTURE.
WE CAN MAKE OUR CAPS FUNCTION AS WELL AS WE POSSIBLY
CAN. BUT FUNDAMENTALLY, YOU HAVE TO LOOK AT ROOT
CAUSES. AND I THINK THAT THOSE ARE SOME OF THE
IMPORTANT THINGS. Kena Hazelwood-Carter: SO
FOLLOWING THIS PANEL, THANK YOU ALL FOR BEING HERE FOR
THIS AMAZING EVENT. THERE WILL BE A RECEPTION. AND
AT THAT RECEPTION, A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT CAMPUS-BASED
ADVOCACY GROUPS THAT DO WORK IN THIS SPACE WILL
BE THERE. UHS TANG, ASUC MENTAL HEALTH COMMISSION,
THE STUDENT TO STUDENT PEER, THEY WILL ALL BE
HERE. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR BEING HERE WITH US THIS
AFTERNOON. (APPLAUSE)

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