Psychodynamic Perspective of Psychology

Psychodynamic Perspective of Psychology


In psychology, there are a number of different
points of view that explain how people think, act, and feel. For example, a behavioural perspective would
emphasize that behaviour is learned from the environment, while a humanistic perspective
argues for the need of self-actualization and growth-seeking. There are others, but perhaps the most interesting
and mysterious is the perspective that tries to explain a more hidden meaning: a riddle
wrapped within the enigma of psychology. Perhaps the idea that “my ancestors did it
to survive so it’s been genetically passed on to me”, or “Everyone else does it so I
should too”, lie on the surface and can be easily uncovered by simple self-analysis. Instead, the psychodynamic perspective argues
that even we ourselves are not aware of our own motives and drives. That early childhood experiences shape us
without our knowledge. What we know about ourselves is but the tip
of the iceberg. Perhaps no behaviour is without cause. Maybe our dreams are messages from the unconscious
mind, telling us what we truly love, fear, and wish for, even if we don’t know it ourselves. The psychodynamic perspective was first created
by Sigmund Freud but also includes the works of his followers and supporters. This perspective is far from the truth, the
whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Freud was heavily criticized for relying exclusively
on case studies and not experiments concerning the general population, although recently,
this has changed within the perspective. This doesn’t mean the whole concept is rubbish. Far from that. Instead, in many areas of psychology, it is
one of multiple explanations, and is definitely a piece of the puzzle, along with the other
perspectives. And until next time, thanks for watching.

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