Why study Psychology at the University of Exeter?

Why study Psychology at the University of Exeter?


Andrew: Psychology is a BPS-accredited course, which means that there are some core modules you have to do, and then around
that core are optional modules that you can tailor your experience as you see fit. Chloe: As soon as I walked into the Psychology building it just felt like a community. Whether it’s discussions with post-grad
students, students from other years, the education and the community within
psychology: there is no limits to it. Professor Manuela Barreto: This department is quite unique in the UK because we concentrate on a variety of areas in psychology, so we have social
psychology, organisational psychology, psychology of addictions, cognitive
psychology and neuroscience. So our students become psychologists that
understand the biological underpinnings of human behaviour: they understand how
the brain functions, how emotions function, but also they can embed that in
the social world where we live. Phedra: It’s given me such a broad range of knowledge
and skills that I never would have got the opportunity to do if I hadn’t gone
to university. When I was researching which university to go to, they were
really focused on the fact that there was a clinical placement involved and
that I would actually get to kind of practise the skills I’d learned
throughout my degree. Chloe: The support network that’s provided here is beyond anything that I’ve heard of: you have the personal tutors, the module conveners, people at the head of your year group; wherever you feel as though you need guidance, it’s always provided. The lecturers have been so enthusiastic and that’s such a massive part of me being able to retain any information! They’re experts in their
field, it really does stand out in their teaching: you can sense their passion and
that just inspires you to learn. Andrew: The average paper gets cited about four to
eight times and one of my module leaders has 250 citations or something, so he’s
very very influential and well-known. Prof Barreto: There’s plenty of opportunities to get
involved in research along the way, not just as participants but as researchers
or interns and assistants on projects. We have consistently, repeatedly been at the
top in employability in the country. That’s because we focus so much on the
development of applied skills as well as the connection to the outside world. Chloe: The opportunity to volunteer with stroke patients, with people with brain injuries, was priceless to me. Phedra: My placement is in Tiverton which is just outside of Exeter. I’m working within a service; any patient that kind of comes through the door gets assessed by somebody like me in the same role. We give people the
opportunity to tell us about the problems they’ve been experiencing in
order to help them manage their symptoms. Prof Barreto: We provide a very high-quality educational experience: the high calibre of our educators and researchers coming
together, the international outlook, the variety within the discipline, how young
and energetic our staff is, always wanting to do things better – we have the conditions to offer the best possible student experience. Chloe: Come with a passion
and whatever that passion is there’s opportunity to research it, to learn
about it, regardless of what it is. Phedra: You get to have the time of your life at
university making so many friends and then you get to go out and do something
that’s really good for someone, and I just think that’s a really rewarding and
lovely thing to do.

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